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#VIDEO Inquest hears that baby’s death was avoidable

first_img Previous articleBasketball Ireland: National Cup Round-UpNext articleKicking out the Jams with Bressie’s Urban Dreamers Staff Reporterhttp://www.limerickpost.ie by Andrew [email protected] up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up THE LIMERICK doctor who treated a woman who lost her baby has said that the infant would have been born alive if the mother was kept in hospital.Consultant Gynacologist Dr Mark Skehan told Limerick Coroner’s Court that he saw expectant mother Amy Delahunt a month before her baby died. Both mother and baby were doing well “and nothing was expected to go wrong”.Ms Delahunt (34) from Borrisoleigh Co Tipperary, wept as she recounted the events leading up to the stillborn birth of her daughter Mary Kate Kelly at the Maternity Hospital in Limerick, on May 28 2013.Before she started her evidence, Ms Delahunt asked if she could pass around a photo of Mary Kate “so everyone knows why we are here”.Ms Delahunt was a patient with consultant gynacologist Dr Mark Skehan in Limerick but on May 21, 2013, she was working in Portlaoise when she sought help regarding her concerns over her baby’s reduction in activity in the womb.She learned of four previous infant deaths at the same hospital in Portlaoise after watching a Prime Time investigation programme.Ms Delahunt told the inquest how she and her partner Oliver Kelly had been trying for many years to start a family and were overjoyed when they finally conceived with the help of fertility treatment.The pregnancy continued as normal until 34 weeks, when Ms Delahunt became concerned about lack of foetal movement. Dr Skehan said that he had seen Ms Delahunt one month earlier and all was well and “nothing was expected to go wrong”.On May 21, 2013, she went to the Maternity Assessment Unit (MAU) in Portlaoise hospital, five minutes from the school where she works as a secondary teacher as she was worried about her baby.She was monitored on CTG, a cardio monitor which gives a trace or graph of the baby’s foetal movements and an ultrasound was carried out.Registered midwife Sally Hanford told the inquest how she aired her concerns to the on-call Registrar Dr Chuck Ugezu about three unprovoked decelerations in the baby’s heart rate as picked up in Ms Delahunt’s CTG trace.Dr Ugezu said it was unnecessary to repeat the trace which he said was normal for this period of pregnancy and he performed an ultrasound scan which he said was fine.Ms Hanford said she told Dr Ugezu that he could not stand over the trace and they needed to contact consultant obstetrician Dr Miriam Doyle who was on duty in the maternity ward to review the trace.Ms Delahunt was subsequently discharged and told to keep a check of foetal movements overnight, ahead of her scheduled anti natal appointment in Limerick, the following morning.When she went for the appointment, she was told by midwives in Limerick that they could find not find a heartbeat on the scan, and that’s when she knew her baby girl was gone.“I just wanted them to deliver the baby straight away. I didn’t want to be carrying around a baby bump with a dead baby inside and people thinking I was going to have a healthy baby.”She had to wait six more days before she finally gave birth to baby Mary Kate.Dr Chuck Ugezu, a former registrar at The Midland Regional Hospital in Portlaoise, apologised for the “understandable upset caused”. He also acknowledged he should have insisted she be admitted on the day she presented at Portlaoise, for further observations and for steroid injections and further CTG traces.Consultant Obstetrician Dr Miriam Doyle said she had no recollection of Ms Delahunt on May 21,  2013 or speaking to midwife Hanford about her case. She said that Ms Delahunt should have been admitted.She also agreed that if she had been kept in hospital, the baby would have born been alive, although it was uncertain how healthy.During the second day of evidence, Dr Skehan said he agreed that Amy Delahunt should have been immediately admitted to Portlaoise hospital.Many of the staff in Limerick were in tears over the death of little Mary Kate and all they could do was “help the mother and try and get through the situation. It is terribly sad and quite difficult in the hospital when there is such an occurrence”.Pathologist, Dr Peter Kelehan, said the cause of death was uncertain but delayed maturation of the placenta, a lateral insertion and hyper coiling of the coil could have contributed.The jury returned a verdict medical misadventure and a number of recommendations were made including that HSE promote lifelong learning amongst medical staff; maternity medical staff should receive adequate and ongoing CTG trace training; the HSE national policy on open disclosure should be implemented in full; there should be clear written instructions on the escalation of care; that patients with non-reassuring CTG traces or with concerns over foetal movements should not be discharged from hospital unless done so by a consultant; expectant mothers discharged from hospital should be given clear written instructions on monitoring foetal movement and that the HSE should publish and be obliged to adhere to adequate staffing levels in all hospitals.Speaking afterwards, the parents of Mary Kate Kelly had these comments. NewsBreaking news#VIDEO Inquest hears that baby’s death was avoidableBy Staff Reporter – December 10, 2014 4502 Shannondoc operating but only by appointment WhatsApp Advertisement RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Print Email TAGSfeaturedfull-image center_img Twitter No vaccines in Limerick yet Linkedin Proceedures and appointments cancelled again at UHL Walk in Covid testing available in Limerick from Saturday 10th April Surgeries and clinic cancellations extended Facebook First Irish death from Coronavirus last_img read more

In the Navajo Nation

first_imgIt’s the middle of winter break at midnight on New Year’s Eve, and eight Harvard students are hiking to a cabin through snow and sagebrush in Navajo, N.M., singing Kanye West songs to distract themselves from the unsettling dark.And so the second year of the Phillips Brooks House Association’s alternative winter break public service trip began.The students traveled to the Navajo Nation reservation to live and work together for a week, forgoing electricity, the internet, and running water as participants in a public service and cultural exchange trip. Navajo undergraduate Damon Clark ’17 also made the trip, one of PBHA’s many immersive opportunities, last year.“I think this experience not only builds a foundational knowledge of Native Americans and Navajo culture, but also lets Harvard students engage with a community that they’ve never worked with before,” said Clark, a social studies concentrator. “I think getting to know each other’s lifestyles is what’s important when we’re struggling with issues of diversity and history. Harvard has a commitment to Native American students, and these experiences with the larger Harvard community are needed. That’s why I took it on — that’s why I do it.”,Clark shares his devotion to diversity and community-building with the PBHA. A student-run organization that strives for social justice through social service and social action, PBHA endeavors to support community needs and promote social awareness. Officially organized in 1904, today it has 1,500 student volunteers running more than 80 social service programs in tandem with local partners, in areas ranging from health to advocacy to mentoring.After driving from Albuquerque to Navajo, participants in this year’s trip settled in on the Clark family homestead. It consists mainly of a large shed, a one-room cabin, and a “hogan,” or traditional Navajo house, heated by wood stoves. The students stayed in the hogan, which is regularly used for a variety of ceremonies. Throughout the week, they chopped wood for heat for the nearby families, spent a day at a local high school, hiked Canyon de Chelly, shelled corn with Clark’s parents, and visited the tribal government and Navajo Nation Museum.“I liked going to sleep early and getting up before 6, and chopping wood,” Andrew Yang ’20 said of his experience, “I liked how good of a workout it was, and how we could help keep someone’s house warm in the process. There isn’t always a lot of time during the semester to volunteer, but the breaks are a perfect time to do it.”Li ’19 (right) looks over homework with a student at Navajo Pine High School. Photo courtesy of Will Li ’19Service was also a draw for Will Li ’19, who is a volunteer for Mission Hill, one of PBHA’s after-school programs: “Public service has given me a sense of purpose in finding small, concrete things I can do to hopefully better the people and communities around me.” Looking back, Li said, “The coolest thing was just getting to live in an authentic Navajo way for a week, doing manual labor, hiking into the homestead, sleeping in a hogan. It gave me a more personal perspective on the culture itself, which is something I don’t think many people get to experience.”While the Navajo Nation program is PBHA’s only Wintersession trip, there are many more run by students through the PBHA Alternative Spring Break program. This spring, students will travel to Mississippi to delve into Civil Rights Movement history, to Louisiana to explore food security and sustainability issues, and to other locations around the country. Programs give students an opportunity to partner with local organizations as they “learn about the social, economic, and political issues affecting the community, all while forging bonds with the people there and with fellow teammates,” the website says.For Clark, this endeavor is as much about personal growth as it is about respectful cultural exchange and service to the community. “It challenges students to think in a different way. Rather than citing a source, they’re working with it, they’re listening to another person, they’re listening to themselves, they’re without an answer, and they have to figure it out. Putting students outside their comfort zone to truly learn adds to the transformative experience that Harvard aims for.”,Without phones or the internet to fall back on, the shared week left the group feeling good about how they served as well as the connections they made together. “There was a moment at Damon’s grandparents’ house, and we were all just chopping wood,” Li recalled, “and it was like we were all part of a fluid machine — people were chopping, moving, stacking wood — and it felt like we were all connected to each other, because everyone was working so harmoniously.”Whether it was through working together, discussing Navajo history with the Clarks, or simply reflecting on the day over dinner, students found that the trip challenged them to engage in public service, expand their knowledge of native culture, and, in a broader sense, learn how to connect better as human beings.“We can get so caught up in what we’re doing at Harvard. We need these kind of breaks,” Clark said simply. That, and the mutual exchange between cultures, he said, are central goals of the trip he hopes will continue in its future iterations.“You bring Harvard to Navajo, but you also bring Navajo to Harvard.”If you are a student and would like to be a part of planning next year’s PBHA trip to Navajo Nation, please email [email protected]last_img read more

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first_img Britain's Joe Salisbury (left) put his troubled build-up behind him Britain's Joe Salisbury (left) put his troubled build-up behind him

PREMIUMOnline groceries thrive as customers avoid supermarkets

first_imgFacebook For Namira Suniaprita, buying groceries at the supermarket is a hassle amid the COVID-19 pandemic. She has to wear a face mask, use latex gloves and immediately wash the clothes she wore to the store upon returning home.“I’m too scared to go to the market. That’s why I buy food supplies online,” said the 22-year-old employee who lives in North Jakarta. As of Tuesday, the North Jakarta administration has reported 25 COVID-19 cases in the area.She said the prices at the online marketplaces were not much higher than at the traditional market, and some marketplaces also offer organic options. She has bought fruits and vegetables, spices and ready-to-cook food, such as instant noodles, from online marketplace Sayurbox.Namira is not the only individual turning to online marketplaces. Food e-commerce has seen rapid growth in customers since the government urg… LOG INDon’t have an account? Register here Google Forgot Password ? Linkedin Log in with your social account Topics : Sayurbox TaniHub marketplace online e-commerce COVID-19 pandemic coronaviruslast_img read more